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Coral Palmer

Page history last edited by mdpalmer 5 years ago

 

 

EDTC 6341 Summer 2009
Facts Design Presentation 
Revised Facts Design Project 
1st Facts Design Project 
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   
   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

   

 

 

Problem-Solving:

Students have to find out how to research for the required material for their project. They should know how to navigate the Web and use different web searchers. After students find information they should know how to filter it and only select needed material to review and analyze. They should be able to copy information and post credits.

 

 

Knowledge:

Disciplinary Structures: Students need to search and gather sufficient information for their project. Disciplinary Process: With the enough information gathered, students should be able to analyze this data and review brainstorming questions on economy, religion, family, ect of both the natives' and the explores' before and after the Discovery. Disciplinary Discourse: Students will come to conclusions of causes and effects and will create a digital presentation to expose them.

 

 

Using Information:

 

 

 

One of the basic skills I would like the students to learn is to research, find, sort and use information for their project.  Students will need to learn to use a range of information sources.  They will learn to see what is important to use for their project and what is not.  They will use this information to analyze, come to conclusions and create their project.

 

 

Search:

 

 

Students will be given a structured information search strategy; a list of all question that need to answer by researching them.  This questioner will help students,  clearly have defined the kind of information they need, and the most likely sources for such information and a search strategy. This quest or search will be some how a scavenger hunt in order to help them narrow their search.  Students will use Search Engines, Online Encyclopedias, and History Data Bases.

 

 

Sort:

 

 

Because of the immense quantity not all quality of information there is on the Web, information has to be sorted.   Because it is very difficult for our students to judge the validity of all the information they could gather, they will be given like a Scavenger Hunt project that will have a list of links that will help the students find, sort and judge.  The Scavenger Hunt will be like a “Pooh Step-by-Step” Guide for their information research.

 

 

Creating and Communicating:

 

 

This lesson is using “Integrated Approach”.  The students will learn searching skills in the content of several subject areas...  By working on this project students will learn transferable skills that integrate and give students skills for coping with real life situations.  By finding all the information on Christopher Columbus voyage, they will create concepts,   come to conclusions.

 

 

The students will need to present their project in class.  Students will use all the information they have gathered, their analysis of it, their conclusion and will communicate there findings and conclusion in their project.  They will use communication skills required.

 

 

Community:

By learning causes and effects on both sides of the story, the natives' and the explores' students should learn life long lessons.

 

Activities

Authentic Activities:

Authentic activity provides experience for subsequent activity. In order to identify authentic activities for the students will depend on a careful analysis of the kinds of things they need to do so solve problems. In this project, students will make believe they will be traveling to the new world to explore and stay to leave. They need to know what other explores have found out and fined different information in order to get prepared for their voyage to the New World.

 

 

Background Building Activities:

In selecting the activates for this project I have to think and prepare a leering environment that will provide them the opportunity to confront facts, ideas, and concepts, reface material, internet recourses. They have to find textbooks databases, I will create a project like a "Scavenger Hunt" where they will find clues to links, or links to clues where they will find all the information needed.

 

 

Constructing Activities:

My students will create a list of things they need to pack related to what they are used to and what is in the new country. They need to create some menus to see about their food. They also need to take security measures depending on the security of the new land and the arms they have. All this information is acquired through a scavenger hunt of person that is all ready in the new word and has tried to communicate to them through the media they have.

 

 

Sharing Activities:

Students will be separated into groups. When they have their list of baggage they need to take and their list of all their considerations and preparation they need to have, they will share it with other groups; having a discussion of why they need to pack or prepare for what they have discussed. Also in their discussion they will include administrative and ruling matters also.

 

Contents

Contents:

§113.7. Social Studies, Grade 5. (a) Introduction. (1) In Grade 5, students learn about the history of the United States from its early beginnings. Students use critical-thinking skills including sequencing, categorizing, and summarizing information and drawing inferences and conclusions. (2) To support the teaching of the essential knowledge and skills, the use of a variety of rich primary and secondary source material such as biographies; novels; speeches and letters; and poetry, songs, and artworks is encouraged. (3) The eight strands of the essential knowledge and skills for social studies are intended to be integrated for instructional purposes with the history and geography strands establishing a sense of time and a sense of place. Skills listed in the geography and social studies skills strands in subsection (b) of this section should be incorporated into the teaching of all essential knowledge and skills for social studies. A greater depth of understanding of complex content material can be attained when integrated social studies content from the various disciplines and critical-thinking skills are taught together. (4) Throughout social studies in Kindergarten-Grade 12, students build a foundation in history; geography; economics; government; citizenship; culture; science, technology, and society; and social studies skills. The content, as appropriate for the grade level or course, enables students to understand the importance of patriotism, function in a free enterprise society, and appreciate the basic democratic values of our state and nation as referenced in the Texas Education Code, §28.002(h). (b) Knowledge and skills. (1) History. The student understands the causes and effects of European colonization in the United States. The student is expected to: (A) explain when, where, and why groups of people colonized and settled in the United States; (8) Geography. The student understands the location and patterns of settlement and the geographic factors that influence where people live. The student is expected to: (A) identify and describe the types of settlement and patterns of land use in the United States; (B) describe clusters of settlement in the United States and explain their distribution; (C) analyze the location of cities in the United States, including capital cities, and explain their distribution, past and present; and (D) explain the geographic factors that influence patterns of settlement and the distribution of population in the United States, past and present. (9) Geography. The student understands how people adapt to and modify their environment. The student is expected to: (A) describe ways people have adapted to and modified their environment in the United States, past and present; (B) identify reasons why people have adapted to and modified their environment in the United States, past and present, such as the use of human resources to meet basic needs; and (C) analyze the consequences of human modification of the environment in the United States, past and present. (10) Economics. The student understands the basic economic patterns of early societies in the United States. The student is expected to: (A) explain the economic patterns of various early Native-American groups in the United States; and (B) explain the economic patterns of early European colonists. (11) Economics. The student understands the reasons for exploration and colonization. The student is expected to: (A) identify the economic motivations for European exploration and settlement in the United States; and (B) identify major industries of colonial America. (12) Economics. The student understands the characteristics and benefits of the free enterprise system in the United States. The student is expected to: (A) describe the development of the free enterprise system in colonial America and the United States; (15) Government. The student understands how people organized governments in colonial America. The stud

 

To Do

To Do List:

My "To Do List"

 

1.- I need to write  a clear list of what exactly I would like the students to foucus on and learn.

 

2.- With this list I myself will start investingating via internet and comminc to find all the data required.  I will like the students to be able to find information reading biogrphies, novel, speeches, letters, peoetry. stories, seeing movies.

 

3.- While I discover myself all these, I will be keep track of all the searchers, and different tools   I encounterd to reach these findings.  (Nettracker, Google, National Geographic, ect)

 

4.- I will create questionar like a savenger hunt with al this findings and give it to the students to work.

 

5.- I will divide the students into grups giving each group pieces of the sca

nvenger hunt.  When they have found thier results students will get together to brains storm.  Consecuently they should be able to answer the original list of question, put it together and create a digital and theatrical presentation.

 

 

 

Contents:

 

 

. Social Studies, Grade 5.

(a) Introduction.

(1) In Grade 5, students learn about the history of the United States from its early beginnings.

Students use critical-thinking skills including sequencing, categorizing, and summarizing information and drawing inferences and conclusions.

(2) To support the teaching of the essential knowledge and skills, the use of a variety of rich primary and secondary source material such as biographies; novels; speeches and letters; and poetry, songs, and artworks is encouraged.

(3) The eight strands of the essential knowledge and skills for social studies are intended to be integrated for instructional purposes with the history and geography strands establishing a sense of time and a sense of place. Skills listed in the geography and social studies skills strands in subsection (b) of this section should be incorporated into the teaching of all essential knowledge and skills for social studies. A greater depth of understanding of complex content material can be attained when integrated social studies content from the various disciplines and critical-thinking skills are taught together.

(4) Throughout social studies in Kindergarten-Grade 12, students build a foundation in history; geography; economics; government; citizenship; culture; science, technology, and society; and social studies skills. The content, as appropriate for the grade level or course, enables students to understand the importance of patriotism, function in a free enterprise society, and appreciate the basic democratic values of our state and nation as referenced in the Texas Education Code, §28.002(h).

(b) Knowledge and skills.

(1) History. The student understands the causes and effects of European colonization in the United States. The student is expected to:

(A) explain when, where, and why groups of people colonized and settled in the United States;

(8) Geography. The student understands the location and patterns of settlement and the geographic factors that influence where people live. The student is expected to:

(A) identify and describe the types of settlement and patterns of land use in the United States;

(B) describe clusters of settlement in the United States and explain their distribution;

(C) analyze the location of cities in the United States, including capital cities, and explain their distribution, past and present; and

(D) explain the geographic factors that influence patterns of settlement and the distribution of population in the United States, past and present.

(9) Geography. The student understands how people adapt to and modify their environment. The student is expected to:

(A) describe ways people have adapted to and modified their environment in the United States, past and present;

(B) identify reasons why people have adapted to and modified their environment in the United States, past and present, such as the use of human resources to meet basic needs; and

(C) analyze the consequences of human modification of the environment in the United States, past and present.

(10) Economics. The student understands the basic economic patterns of early societies in the United States. The student is expected to:

(A) explain the economic patterns of various early Native-American groups in the United States; and

(B) explain the economic patterns of early European colonists.

(11) Economics. The student understands the reasons for exploration and colonization. The student is expected to:

(A) identify the economic motivations for European exploration and settlement in the United States; and

(B) identify major industries of colonial America.

(12) Economics. The student understands the characteristics and benefits of the free enterprise system in the United States. The student is expected to:

(A) describe the development of the free enterprise system in colonial America and the United States;

(15) Government. The student understands how people organized governments in colonial America. The student is expected to:

(A) compare the systems of government of early European colonists

(18) Citizenship. The student understands important customs, symbols, and celebrations that represent American beliefs and principles and contribute to our national identity

(D) describe the origins and significance of national celebrations such as Memorial Day, Labor Day, and Columbus Day.

(22) Culture. The student understands the relationship between the arts and the times during which they were created. The student is expected to:

(A) identify significant examples of art, music, and literature from various periods in U.S. history; and

(B) explain how examples of art, music, and literature reflect the times during which they were created.

(23) Culture. The student understands the contributions of people of various racial, ethnic, and religious groups to the United States. The student is expected to:

(A) identify the similarities and differences within and among selected racial, ethnic, and religious groups in the United States;

(B) describe customs, celebrations, and traditions of selected racial, ethnic, and religious groups in the United States; and

(C) summarize the contributions of people of selected racial, ethnic, and religious groups to our national identity.

(25) Social studies skills. The student applies critical-thinking skills to organize and use information acquired from a variety of sources including electronic technology. The student is expected to:

(A) differentiate between, locate, and use primary and secondary sources such as computer software; interviews; biographies; oral, print, and visual material; and artifacts to acquire information about the United States and Texas;

(B) analyze information by sequencing, categorizing, identifying cause-and-effect relationships, comparing, contrasting, finding the main idea, summarizing, making generalizations and predictions, and drawing inferences and conclusions;

(C) organize and interpret information in outlines, reports, databases, and visuals including graphs, charts, timelines, and maps;

(D) identify different points of view about an issue or topic;

(E) identify the elements of frame of reference that influenced the participants in an event; and

(F) use appropriate mathematical skills to interpret social studies information such as maps and graphs.

(26) Social studies skills. The student communicates in written, oral, and visual forms. The student is expected to:

(A) use social studies terminology correctly;

(B) incorporate main and supporting ideas in verbal and written communication;

(C) express ideas orally based on research and experiences;

(D) create written and visual material such as journal entries, reports, graphic organizers, outlines, and bibliographies; and

(E) use standard grammar, spelling, sentence structure, and punctuation.

(27) Social studies skills. The student uses problem-solving and decision-making skills, working independently and with others, in a variety of settings. The student is expected to:

(A) use a problem-solving process to identify a problem, gather information, list and consider options, consider advantages and disadvantages, choose and implement a solution, and evaluate the effectiveness of the solution; and

(B) use a decision-making process to identify a situation that requires a decision, gather information, identify options, predict consequences, and take action to implement a decision.

 

 

Design Challenge Two

 

 

Top Ten Principles of the

 Efficiency Model

 

 

1.- Programed Instruction: Curriculum is standarized. (TEKS)

2.- Learning small, isiolated skills and facts like an hour of reading, an hour of math, ect.

3.- Teachers teach, students listen

4.- Only source of information is the teacher and the books

5.- Independent work.

6.- Students memorize facts.

7.-Students are tested on facts learned.

8.- Standarized Assesment for all.

9.- Classical instruction

10.- Isolation of classroom form the rest of the world.

 

 

Top Ten Challenges to the

 Efficiency Model

 

1.- Innovative design of learning, multiple learning modalities.

 

2.- Plan methods and techniques to teach several subjects at a time, in inovative   projects or lessons

 

3.- Teachers facilitate, students, students think and construct.

 

4.- Knowledge is adquired though experiences of hypothesizing and predicting, manipulating objects and data, imagining, and researching answers.

 

5.- Group work were students help each other and learn from each other.

 

6.- Students analize information.

 

7- Students will problem solve, and comunicate.

 

8.- Completion of individual assignments, individual grading systems.

 

9.- Integrating technology in instruction.

 

10.- Student being a citizen of the world, adquiring workd information and knowedgle using communication tools.

 

 

Step 1 - Define A Learning Goal:

 

 

My Kindergarten students will learn about the desert, its components, vegetation and life.  This is a technology science class. Searching and creating is their main goal.

 

 

Step 2 - State Learning Objectives:

 

 

Using a classroom computer ,the kindergarten students should be able to (a) Open the Program KidPix (b) Upload project section (c) Create project  (d)Print their project.

 

 

Step 3 - Sequence Instruction:

 

 

Teacher will model the project:  Teacher will use her computer, a projector and a screen to demonstrate the project objective.  Together teacher and students will brain storm about the "Dessert" its surroundings, its vegetations and other living organisms.  Teacher will create that project using kidPix and will go over every step of its creation.  At the end of the teacher's model, she will ask to see if there are any questions, if there is are she will explain or will reteach.  The teacher will send students to their computers leaving the project projected on the screen for it to guide them.  Students will go to their own workstations using each a computer applying all computer basics learned such as mouse skills (click, click drag, and double click), opening windows, selecting form menus, and activating buttons.

 

 

(a) Students should be able to find the shortcut or icon for the program KidPix. (b) Students should be able to open the program either by clicking the shortcut or double clicking the icon (c) Once in the program students should be able to navigate and find the "color me" section.(d)

b) find  and upload  the desert project section (c) students should be able to navigate and find the tools necessary to color the project.  Three color patterns should be used: Solids, rainbows and patterns, (d)After the coloring students should be able to navigate to the add ons and find stickers related to the lesson, example vegetation, living organisms and other.  Students will place these accordingly.  Students will raise their hand and other fellow classmates will try to help each other.  Teacher will be walking around and supervising and if needed  will help students. (e) When students finish their project they will need to print it.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Determine Learning Success:

 

 

Because this class is for Kindergarten, in order to assess them teacher will demonstrate a project using computer and projector.  Students should create their project on their own. No students will help others.  Teacher will determine who and how much a student has not met. For those students that were not able to complete assignment, the teacher will demonstrate again the steps and sequences of the project. There will be step by step reteach.

 

 

 

 

A Reflection and Critique of the Design:

 

 

 

 

Using my Top 10 Challenges to the Efficiency Model I will try to crate a comparison of my actual top to challenges and my goals, objectives and design of my class.

 

 

Actually my class because it it’s oriented to Kindergarten students, has a mixture of the Challenges to the Efficiency Model, however with a tendency to the Efficiency Model class.

 

 

 

 

My class has the strength that I combine both Efficiency Model and the Challenge Efficiency Model design.  My class is based on the TEKS. What students at that grade level should be able to do? I brainstorm with my students to help them think, listen, share, and analyze what a dessert is and its components. The program SiPix has a multiple screens, menus, bottoms, and subjects to select.  This allows students to differentiate and select appropriate materials and tools to create project. While modeling the lesson, students should practice memorization of steps that even though at first glance appeared to be passive absorption of data takes place with a framework of constructive cognitive ability.  The limitations I see in my project are several.  Fist, equipment and software should be working properly. Differentiation of instruction might be necessary for several students.  My design is consistent with the attributes of Today's Technology Users, because students will be taught the essentials of computing, Opening programs, using tools adequately like clicking, double clicking click and drag, searching, selecting, and printing a project.  Because the subject is a Dessert, it is u unlikely that kindergarten students have experience actual being in a dessert.  However, outside the classroom, maybe in books, movies, TV shows, students has been exposed what a "dessert" is and students will apply these experiences in knowing what a dessert it.  My design conflict with constructive learning because even though we use technology and students are enhancing their technology skills my science class is a traditional class that presents students with limited facts and concepts.  However, I think is a good design because it combines both The Efficiency Model and The Challenge Efficiency Model design, a perfect balance and marriage. 

 

The Efficiency Model

A Learning Design

Top 10 Principles of the Efficiency Model

1.- Programed Insruction: Curriculum is standarized. (TEKS) 2.- Learning small, isiolated skills and facts like an hour of reading, an hour of math, ect. 3.- Teachers teach, students listen 4.- Only source of information is the teacher and the books 5.- Independent work. 6.- Students memorize facts. 7.-Students are tested on facts learned. 8.- Standarized Assesment for all. 9.- Classical instruction 10.- Isolation of classroom form the rest of the world.

Top 10 Challenges to the Efficiency Model

1.- Innovative design of learning, multiple learning modalities. 2.- Plan methods and techniques to teach several subjects at a time, in inovative projects or lessons 3.- Teachers facilitate, students, students think and construct. 4.- Knowledge is adquired though experiences of hypothesizing and predicting, manipulating objects and data, imagining, and researching answers. 5.- Group work were students help each other and learn from each other. 6.- Students analize information. 7- Students will problem solve, and comunicate. 8.- Completion of individual assignments, individual grading systems. 9.- Integrating technology in instruction. 10.- Student being a citizen of the world, adquiring workd information and knowedgle using communication tools.

Step One: Define a Learn Goal

My Kindergarten students will learn about the desert, it's components, vegetation and life. This is a technology science class. Searching and creating is their main goal.

Step Two: State Objectives

Using a classroom computer ,the kindergarten students should be able to (a) Open the Program KidPix (b)Upload project section (c) Create project (d)Print their project.

Step Three: Sequence Instruction

Teacher will model the project: Teacher will use her computer, a projector and a screen to domonstrate the project objective. Together teacher and students will brain storm about the "Dessert" its surroundings, it's vegetations and other living organizims. Teacher will create that project using kidPix and will go over every step of its creation. At the end of the teacher's model, she will ask to see if there are any questions, if there is are she will explain or will reteach. After that teacher will send students to their computers leaving the project projected on the screen for it to guide them. Students will go to their own workstations using each a computer appling all computer basics learned such as mouse skills (click, click drag, and double click), opening windows, selecting form menus,and activating bottons. (a) Students should be able to find the shortcut or icon for the program KidPix. (b) Students should be able to open the program either by clicking the shortcout or doble cllicking the icon (c) Once in the program students should be able to navigate and find the "color me" section.(d) b) find and upload the desert project section (c) students should be able to navigate and find the tools necesery to color the project. Three bolor patterns should be used: Solids, rainbows and patterns, (d)After the coloring students should be able to navigate to the add ons and find stickers related to the lesson example vegetation, living organizish and other. Students will place these acordanly. Students will raise their hand and other fellow classmates will try to help each other. Teacher will be walking around and supervising and if neede helping. (e) When students finish their project they will need to print it.

Step Four: Determine Learning Success

Because this class is for Kindergarten, inorder to assess them tacher will demonstrate a project using computer and projector. Students should create there project on their own. No students will help others. Teacher will determine who and how much a student has not met. For thoes students that were not able to complete assignment, the teacher will demonstrate again the steps and sequences of the project.There will be reteach step by step.

A Reflection and Critique of the DesignUsing my Top 10 Challanges to the Effciency Model I will try to crate a comparison of my actual top to challanges and my goals, objectives and design of my class. Actually my class because it its oriented to Kindergarten students, has a mixture of the Challages to the Efficiency Model , however with a tendenct to the Efficiency Model class. My class has the strenght that I combine both Efficiency Model and the Challenge Efficiency Model design. My class is based on the TEKS. What students at that grade level should be able to do. I brainstorm with my students to help them think, listen, share, and analys what a dessert is and its componants. The prograqm KidPix has a montiple screens, menus, bottens, and subjects to select. This allows students to difrentiate and select appropiate materials and tools to create project. While modeling the lesson, students should practice memorisation of steps that even though at first glance apprearce to be pasive absorption of data takes place with a framework of constructivecognitive ability. The limimtations I see in my project are several. Fist, equipment and software should be working propely. Difrentiation of instruction might be necessary for several students. My desgin is consistent with the attributes of Today's Technology Users, because students will be taught the essencials of computing, Opening programs, using tools adequtily like clicking, doble cliking click and drag, searching, selecting, and printing a project. Because the subject is a Dessert, it is u nlikely that kindergaten students have experience actual being in a dessert. However, outside the classroom, mabe in books, movies, tv shows, students have been expoused what a "dessert" is and students will apply these experiences in knowing what a dessert it. My design conflict with constructive learning because even though we use technology and students are enhancing their technology skills my science class is a traditional class that presesnts students with limited facts and concepts.

 

 

Design Challange Three

 

 

The FACTS Model of Design

Teachers as Designers: A Cinquain Poem

TEACHER Facilitator Originator, Creator Architect, Author, Inventor Structuring, Providing, Coaching, Planning Pioneer

Teachers as Designers: A Diamente Poem

TEACHER Facilitator Persuader, Designer, Structuring, Provisioning, Orchestrating Originator, Architect, Presenter, Lecturer Reading, Assessing, Instructing Traditional, Conventional Tutor

The FACTS Model: A Summary

Well, FACTS really work! It actively engages the learner in what they need the most. It supports and enhances learning ideas or concepts, great for assessment!

The F is for Foundations

Students to be successful need a solid foundation of basic literacy, computer skills, thinking skills, creative thinking,decision making, problem solving, personal qualities and competencies.

The A is for Activity

Engaging students in activities is essential and integral. These will help students become competent with cognitive, memory, metacognition, problem solving. Anchored instruction creates this activates.

The C is for Content

Learning the Contents which lie in the core subjects in curriculum, conceptas, disiplines and practices enable students to be knowledgeable, literature and use information correctly.

The T is for Tools

Enhanced learning is best supported with the following tools; Books, Videos, Computer Software, Computer Graphics, Word Editors, Databases, Telecommunication, Internet, Multimedia, Hypermedia, and Mathematical Devices.

The S is for Systems of Assessment

A variety of alternative assessment strategies combine d to assess a wide range multiple nature students’ learning, influence the overall success of a learning design.

 

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