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EDTC6340moonphases

Page history last edited by patty 9 years, 7 months ago

Lesson Plan

TEKS: 4.8 Earth and space. The student knows that there are recognizable patterns in the natural world and among the Sun, Earth, and Moon system. The student is expected to:

(C) Collect and analyze data to identify sequences and predict patterns of change in the observable appearance of the Moon over time.

4.3 Scientific investigation and reasoning. The student uses critical thinking and scientific problem solving to make informed decisions. The student is expected to:

(C) Represent the natural world using models…and identify their limitations, including accuracy and size.

 

Concept: Lunar Cycle

Content Objective:

  • I will make a model of the Sun/Earth/Moon system and identify its limitations

  • I will collect data (observations) of the moon over time

  • I will look at my data to find a pattern in the moon

  • I will use what I know about the moon’s pattern to predict the next or previous phase of the moon

ENGAGE

Agenda:

TLW be given a card that says “My Birthday Moon” with the following instructions:

  • Google “Moon Phase Calendar”

  • Click on the first link

  • Find your birth month

  • Shade in the moon above to look like the moon on the day you were born

 TTW question students:

  • Let’s look at our birthday moons. Show your neighbor – do they look, or appear, the same?

  • Who has a moon showing a lot of light? Who has a moon showing a little bit of light or no light?

TTW discussion and set learning goal (transition to explore activity):

  • Did you ever wonder why the moon looks bright? Or why it looks, or appears, different each night? Or why sometimes you don’t see the moon at all?

  • Did you know each shape of the moon has a different name?

  • Are you wondering what the moon was called on the day you were born?

  • We will do some activities to find out why the moon appears the way it does and why it changes. Then, you will be able to find out the name of the moon on the day you were born and to predict what it looked like before and after.

Key Concepts, Vocabulary, and Question Stems:

Moon, appear

See question stems above

Gifted and Talented Strategies or Alternative Tasks:

Sheltered Instruction Strategies:

visual references

EXPLORE

Agenda:

Set up: Bare light bulb in socket – about eye height, table tennis balls on skewers

TTW set goal for activity: In this activity, we will make a model of the Sun, Earth, and Moon to show why the moon appears different each night.

  • Does anyone know what a model is?

  • How are models useful to us?

TTW pair students. TTW, in pairs, follow teacher’s prompts:

  • In this model, the table tennis ball will represent the moon, your head will represent the Earth, and this bulb will represent the Sun. What do I mean by represent?

Part 1:

  • Hold the ball right in front of you, and a little above your head.

  • First, stand with the ball (moon) between you and the bulb (Sun). How much of the ball/moon is lit? What does it look like (how does it appear)? Does anyone know the name of the moon phase when we don’t see any of it lit?

  • Then, very slowly, turn counterclockwise (leading with your left shoulder) making the moon revolve around the Earth. Notice where the light appears. What side of the ball/moon does the light appear on? What does it look like?

  • Slowly move a bit more until your right shoulder is pointing toward the bulb. How much of the ball/moon appears lit now?

  • Move a little more, now how much appears lit?

  • Now turn until your back is to the bulb/sun. How much is lit? Does anyone know what the phase of the moon is called when it is all lit?

  • (continue in increments until they are back at the start)

Part 2:

  • Now, hold the moon at your waist. Make it revolve again – what do you notice? If half of it is always lit by the Sun, why do we not always see that half?

  • What can this model show us? Which parts are accurate? What are some limitations of the model?

 

  • Now, you will repeat the revolution of the moon around the Earth, but this time you will use the record sheet to draw your observations. You will draw the appearance of the moon from Earth at each position.

TTW repeat the activity, this time collecting data/recording the appearance of the moon as it revolves. Student pairs will discuss their observations and record them on the record sheet to complete the task.

Key Concepts, Vocabulary, and Question Stems:

represent, moon, phase, appear, lit, new moon, full moon, model, limitations

  • The moon does not produce its own light, it reflects the Sun’s light

  • Although half of the moon is always lit, as it revolves around the Earth, and different amounts are visible each night.

EXPLAIN

Agenda:

(Use the activity “Lunar Looking” from AIMS TX 4th Grade Earth Science)

TTW ask students to explain what they learned during the exploration:

  • How did the moon look during new moon? How did it look when it was full? How did its appearance change from new moon to full moon? On which side did the light appear?

  • How did the appearance of the moon change from full moon back to new moon? On which side did the light disappear from? On which side did it remain?

TSW each receive a set of moon phase cards. TSW, in groups (combining cards) each receive eight cards. TSW then draw a card from the hand of any player and replace that card with one of their own. The first person to collect a complete moon sequence wins.

TSW re-distribute cards so each player has one of each phase. TSW, using record sheet from explore, place the phases of the moon in order.

TTW probe with questions:

  • Which was the first phase we observed? Then….? What is the name of the phase when the moon appears half lit?

  • Since it takes about 28 days to complete a moon cycle, how many cards would you need to add to our set of eight cards to illustrate the cycle? What would those cards look like?

TSW assemble the “Lunar Looking Turn-Around Page” and label the phases from the cards.

TTW probe with questions:

  • Which phase would come next? Which of these phases would it look like?

  • Which phase would come after that? What does this tell you?

  • How can you tell the quarter (or crescent, or gibbous) moons apart?

TSW flip the pictures over, TTW repeat the questions.

ELABORATE

Agenda:

TSW, in partners, practice what they know. TSW place the moon phase cards in order. They may check with partners and refer back to previous activity, if needed.

TSW ask each other the following questions (on cards):

  • Which phase follows new moon? Which phase follows full moon? How does the moon change when it is waxing? How does the moon change when it is waning? Where is the moon compared to the Earth and Sun when it is new moon? Where is the moon compared to Earth and Sun when it is full moon? Which phase comes after…? Which phase comes before…?

EVALUATE

Agenda:

TSW order the phases of the moon and answer some open-ended questions regarding the Sun/Moon/Earth system and lunar phases.

 

PROJECT

TSW be asked to take pictures of the moon for a whole month at 9:00pm. They are to also keep a log to record the weather conditions for that night and any other personal notes. The students will be asked to create a photostory using photostory 3.

 

Materials:

  • Computer with internet connection and printer

  • United streaming video of moon phases

  • Science book

  • Camera

  • Construction paper, poster boards.

  • Modeling clay, foam balls

  • Paint, paint brushes

  • Markers, Crayons

  • Glue, scissors, tape

  • Photostory 3

  • Powerpoint

  • Microphone

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Which phase follows new moon?

Which phase comes before new moon?

Which phase follows full moon?

Which phase comes before full moon?

Which phase follows waxing crescent moon?

Which phase comes before waxing crescent moon?

Which phase follows first quarter moon?

Which phase comes before first quarter moon?

Which phase follows waxing gibbous moon?

Which phase comes before waxing gibbous moon?

Which phase follows waning gibbous moon?

Which phase comes before waning gibbous moon?

Which phase follows third quarter moon?

Which phase comes before third quarter moon?

Which phase follows waning crescent moon?

Which phase comes before waning crescent moon?

How does the moon change when it is waxing?

How does the moon change when it is waning?

Where is the moon compared to the Earth and Sun when it is new moon?

Where is the moon compared to Earth and Sun when it is full moon?

 

 

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